Friday, September 18, 2009

Jewish Hospitals and Societies Which Cared for the Needy in NYC (1902)

ABOUT $1,000,000 A YEAR IS EXPENDED BY PHILANTHROPY TO PREVENT THE NEEDY OF THEIR RACE FROM BECOMING PUBLIC CHARGES....AID THOUSANDS OF POOR.

This is the title of the latest article that can be found within the Museum of Family History's "Living in America: The Jewish Experience" wing. The two-page article appeared in the New York Tribune Illustrated Supplement on October 5, 1902 .

In order to understand the Jewish experience in New York City at the turn of the 20th century, it is important to understand the nature of Jewish philanthropy. Philanthropists helped finance many projects and institutions that helped those in need during those trying times, whether they be infants or children, Jewish or not.

In this informative article you will learn about these institutions, some of which only came into existence in the mid to late 1800s.

Some of the institutions discussed in this article are:

Hospitals: Mount Sinai, Lebanon and Beth Israel.

Homes: Montefiore Home for Chronic Invalids, Home for Aged and Infirm Hebrews of New York, and the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith.

Orphan Asylums: Hebrew Benevolent and Orphan Asylum, Hebrew Sheltering Guardian Society and the Hebrew Infant Asylum.

Other: Educational Alliance, Clara de Hirsch Home for Working Girls, Gemilath Chasodim Association, and the Baron de Hirsch Trade School.

This article can be found at www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/philanthropy-jewish-01.htm.

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